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Sugar Diabetes Diet - The Sweet Way to Control Your Levels

Sugar Diabetes Diet – The Sweet Way to Control Your Levels

What is The Sugar Diabetes Diet  ?

Millions of Americans possess diabetes type 1 and 2, and might be helped tremendously by a simple sugar diabetes diet . Diabetic issues can prevent your physique from regulating it’s blood sugar levels, it can also lead to severe health issues including high cholesterol levels, blindness, kidney illness, heart disease, and much more if left untreated. If you were diagnosed with diabetes, talk with your health care provider about how the sugar diabetes diet can help you manage your diabetic issues.

Any sugar diabetes diet that you look at  is going to discuss how eating low levels of carbs and plenty of healthy proteins is the secret. Carbohydrates help prevent the production of certain kinds of hormones which help in the production of insulin. When the body does not produce sufficient insulin, the body uses up glucose instead of body fat and it means you’ll have to start taking insulin shots or switch to the Sugar Diabetes Diet.

In order to control glucose levels, doctors often don’t know or understand how to make a sugar diabetes diet work for someone . With the sugar diabetes diet,it is important to not guess at your blood sugar levels. There uncertainty can be dangerous because the nutritionist  needs to put together a proper meal plan , so you can live life as normal as possible and improve your diabetic issues at same period.

Sugar-diabetes-diet

The best way to reduced index list diet has been ruling carbs completely as well as corn, which is one of the sugar diabetes diets worst enemy. Some fitness and equipment time accompanied with some physical exercise plus at least 20-25 gr of processed foods is vital to make this diet work. To become ready for a new wellness program it is recommended that a time gap with a minimum of 4 hours should be followed between each meal as well as helping boost your basal metabolism and thus burning up the stored fat. Avoid Dangerous toxic compounds a day before eating anything on the sugar diabetes diet. Once before your cardio and again prior to my weight loss medicines and always say no to processed foods.  Natural alternatives such as fruits as well as other nutrients could easily be made with a healthy salad plate.

Steer clear of sodas and beverages that contain large amounts of artificial sugar. Many companies right now make a sugar-free alternative that’s safe for a sugar diabetes diet. Water is your very best choice for a rejuvenating drink because it detoxifies your body and has absolutely no effect on your blood glucose levels. If you get really tired of just plain drinking water, add some zesty lemon or lime peels, or even cucumber slices. Clean mint leaves are another great option and alternative

Diabetes can be managed with the sugar diabetes diet or with stem cell diabetes treatment but there are guidelines to follow and these guidelines will make you a more happy, healthier person in the long term. Following these tips combined with the sugar diabetes diet for prescribed by your physician. This new wonder routine will help you keep a super tight reign on your blood sugar levels.

Categories: Fat Loss

146 comments

  • Ms. T December 29, 2011 at 1:16 am -

    Basically you need to stop eating sugar. My doctor referred me to a place which teaches diabetics how to use the meter to check blood sugar. A dietitian came one day and discussed our diets and there was another session but I forget now what it was about.

    The dietitian said that we could treat ourselves to two small cookies a week but other than that no more sugar. Use Splenda or whatever other artificial sweetener you like. Cut down on fats. Cut out all starches since starches convert to sugar. Don't eat corn and most fruits because they have a high sugar content. Eat foods with fiber.

    It's important to test your blood sugar level two hours after every meal. I keep track of what I eat and if my blood sugar is high I know that I've eaten something I shouldn't. I figure out what it was and cut it out of my diet. If you follow the diabetic diet you will lose weight. It doesn't require weighing food or counting calories.

    Ask your doctor if he can refer you somewhere for diabetic classes. There must be someplace somewhere available to you. If I remember correctly my classes ran for three sessions. If he doesn't refer you call around to the hospitals. Also, check out your health insurance. Some of them cover the cost of the program.

    It's very important that you learn as much as you can about your disease. Failure to watch what you eat will eventually lead to blindness or kidney failure or poor circulation which can result in loss of limbs (extremities) and heart failure. My brother-in-law died when he was 44; he had been diabetic since he was 9. He died of kidney failure and heart disease. He also lost all feeling in his feet because of circulatory problems.

  • TheOrange Evil

    OK so here is my full disclosure: I am a Type 1b diabetic on 3 kinds of insulin and Metformin. Since diagnosis I have been on a low-carb diet and have kept my HBA1C consistently under 6. My last A1c was 5.6%. I am 13 weeks pregnant and also having the same arguments with my diabetes team. I usually eat 50-100 grams of carb a day; they want me on at least 100.

    My diabetes team is generally quite cool with my self-management and they couldn't care less how much or how little carb I eat when not pregnant. But they are telling me that pregnancy is a different issue entirely. As I don't have evidence to the contrary, I am trying to meet them halfway and trying to get at least 100g of carb a day. I should point out that by the standards of the normal world, 100g of carb is still a pretty low-carb diet.

    So I think that you should immediately sack your dietitian because she is telling you a crock of shit. It is the classic shit advice given by old-time nutritionists who do not have diabetes. It is a fairy story where fat is the enemy – when anybody with diabetes knows in their first 24 hours with a blood glucose meter that fat is not the enemy, it is carb that is the enemy.

    The most important thing you need to know is that your priority is keeping your blood sugars as close to normal as you can. That's to avoid complications for you and for baby. It sounds like you already have a great diet routine in place for good blood sugars. Please don't let this idiot's rubbish advice distract you! A diet high in non starchy veggies and beans is really healthy!!

    Finally I want to say that if you need it, please don't be afraid of taking insulin. I'm in a slightly different situation to you because I have insulin-deficient diabetes and my pancreas does not produce any insulin at all so I have to inject all of it. I am currently ridiculously insulin-resistant due to the pregnancy. In the morning, I need 1 unit of insulin for plain old oxygen, and 2 units of insulin per cup of tea with milk and no sugar. So I need injections just to survive. But for you, it might be possible that as your pregnancy progresses, you might get more insulin-resistant, and that a low-carb diet would be insufficient in keeping your blood sugar normal. If that is the case, please do not be afraid and do not consider it a failure. Insulin is safe and effective and the needles are so small they really do not hurt at all. And ultimately, what is most important is that you use every tool at your disposal to maintain the optimal conditions for mother and baby.

    I hope all goes well for you. Please feel free to message me if you need further advice.

  • ticel buszarothe

    It's called Periodontal disease, sir, and it's more common in diabetes patients. This does NOT mean, however, that all diabetics will suffer with it.

    There are many pages on the internet that offer advice and explanations about periodontal disease. Here are just a few.

  • meset sha January 4, 2012 at 1:36 am -

    Read the ice cream label you can have about 1/2 cup for approx 20 carbs that could be a snack it would not hurt a thing also if you have it in a cone it will take you longer to eat and make you feel more satisfied! Go for a walk after that will get you insulin working to!

  • wick

    Among the weight loss hindrances, low blood sugar and diabetes are two culprits that are on the opposite end of the blood sugar spectrum. Here’s some advice on both.

  • kido robeckelo January 8, 2012 at 6:45 am -

    I can't offer you any advice, but I am interested as to what others may have to say. I was diagnosed with GD with two out of four of my children and was also toxemic with the same two……one of whom turned out to have PDD/ASD. I know many other NA's who also have children with PDD or ASD that had GD while pregnant. I am wondering if there is a predisposition to it in our genetics or if it correlates to the GD.

    You know your body better than the doctors and only you know how certain foods/amounts will make you feel…….Is there a different nutritional coach you can see? Are you on Res? Most of the Res' here in Ontario, Canada employ diabetic/nutritional coaches……and healthy babies/healthy children nurses that can offer alternatives to the insulin.

  • red jaco

    Every carbohydrate that you eat, takes you toward insulin resistance. When your resistance becomes high, you are pre diabetic. When your resistance is so great that you can not make enough insulin, your blood sugar goes up, and you are known as a diabetic. The great thing is that when you are in the pre-diabetic stage, it can be completely reversed. A month or two on a sever carbohydrate restriction will reset your resistance by 10 years. Then all you have to do is balance your carbs, fats, and proteins. Stick with the natural saturated fat, as these new fake fats, like trans fats and canola, will kill you.

  • kawanichts zachabilho

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • karbirover carieu

    A healthy diabetics snacks and sugar free desserts before attending a summertime event may help to satisfy you for longer than if youCarrots was to attend the event on an empty stomach

  • korp luquier

    u hav type 1

    type 1= poeple on insulin and are younger and not necessarily unhealthy or overweight

    type 2=sometimes on pills and are older and or overweight

  • aki fer February 9, 2012 at 10:27 am -

    First, call your doctor for a referral to an endocrinologist, or a diabetes doctor. Your current doctor is, if I may be frank, inept.

    Second, what you need to watch is your carb count, not just (or rather, not specifically) sugar. About 150 grams of carbohydrates a day is a good place to start for most people- you shouldn't really have less than 120 or more than 180 grams. Buy a pocket carb counting book- it's great for things that don't have labels, like fresh fruits and vegetables. There's no food you should/shouldn't eat: it's all about moderation. So, while it would be a bad idea to eat a pint of ice cream every day, eating half a cup once or twice a week isn't going to do you in.

    Third, you need to be testing your blood glucose, and frequently: testing your glucose levels at home is key to good management and knowing how you react to stress, or certain foods, or hormones. If your doctor hasn't prescribed you a meter and test strips, ask him to do so when you call him for a referral, because getting an appointment with an endocrinologist can take a good month in some cases. You should aim for the numbers to be between 70-110 when you first wake up in the morning, and up to 140 two hours after meals. If the number is ever over 400, or the meter ever reads "HI" go to an ER.

  • mebaidison

    i have to have this check soon as i'm 24 weeks and i'm a bit nervous but if it any help I've had a crap pregnancy all the way through so far except from a few good days lol so don't feel guilty if you don't feel great all the time and it wasn't the same as people you know because every pregnancy different! just enjoy it the best you can and good luck x

  • cormie

    cut down on your sugar intake and go see your GP or phone your local hospital for medication.

    You should have been be given a doctors appointment to then see what type of diabetes you have/what stage it is and to be tablets or insulin

    if you want to know anymore

  • vandinson wilbotenbe

    ODing on robotussin is really stupid. the trip doesnt really do anything, and it has some serious side effects. i would just smoke weed. if your worried about legality smoke K2 spice or salvia.

  • ekruya secak

    The value of blood vessels glucose can rise or slide right after a meal relying on which folks have picked to eat for that particular meal. Because this has big implications for folks undergoing diabetes, it is vital for it to choose …

  • braga

    of course the pancakes are going to have more calories and carbs than 3 egg sandwiches.they are grains,and grains are the food group with the most calories and carbs,but that doesnt make them unhealthy.actually your supposed to eat more grains than any other food group.calories arent bad,however excessive calories and no excercise is.

  • reuter becky

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • eville

    “I don't like those. Real food in the right proportions. That's all you need to do.”Hubby is a Type 2 diabetic – diagnosed three months ago. Our house has more fruit and veges than ever, less garbage food and the occasional treat is still allowed.We are all healthier because of it!]]>

  • ost vindols

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • out boeber

    Tell them you're sorry that they dont understand that you dont feel the need to be what the world would call a "perfect" model. and that you're happy the way you are. and the only thing you're sorry about is that they cant comprehend that.

  • gle

    No real doctor will do a surgery on your mother when she's only 150.

    Honestly, if she's like this, she'll gain it all back.

    She needs to follow her own doctor's instructions, i.e. ** healthy ** eating and exercise, to keep her blood sugar under control. There is really nothing more you can do for her.

  • merics hawkes

    This is rubbish science.

    Absolutely fails to explain how egg consumption is linked to diabetes.

    Diabetes is a disorder of carbohydrate metabolism. Eggs are one of the lowest carb foods around. Eggs are in fact one of the most diabetes-friendly foods because they do not spike blood sugar levels.

    It is absolute hogwash that 'high levels of cholesterol and saturated fats…increase the risk of type 2 diabetes'.

  • chez balen

    This is unfortunately a common problem. It is difficult for the patient to adjust to the diagnosis of diabetes and its treatment. It is all too often that the spouse has even greater difficulty understanding your diagnosis and treatment. I do not know that there is any particular way to help your spouse understand what you are going through. My recommendation is to ask your spouse to accompany you to your physician visits. This way the physician's education will be given to both you and your spouse. An alternative is to ask your physician to send you to a diabetic nurse educator and ask your spouse to accompany you. A medical problem is difficult for both patient, spouse, and family to accept and deal with. Open communication most especially as aided by the physician may be the key that you need to success. If I may be of further assistance please let me know. I wish you the very best of health and in all things may God bless.

  • ster sieghi

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • glyn

    well, medical journals, medical internet sites such as webmd.com. try typing medical websites into the yahoo search and try some of those that pop up. go to the library and get a book on the subject. stuff like that.

  • kingh tigle

    Your situation sucks and i am sorry that you have to experience this…but what i am going to tell you is not going to be much better.

    Yes your beautiful baby can get brain damage from you not getting enough sugar and carbs. You brain (and whole body for that matter) needs 3 things to survive.

    1) Oxygen
    2) Water
    3) Sugar

    Sugar is also in the carbs that you eat and is needed for all of your organs to function properly. If you are not healthy your baby will not be either. Your baby can also be under developed in other areas like heart and lungs.

    I am so sorry that your husband is not being supportive you may need to drag him to the Dr with you so that he can understand what this is doing to your body and the development of your unborn child. Please don't feel that you are being selfish, people will tell you that because they do not understand what you are going through.

    Best of Luck to you and your Baby!

  • hypernova

    Basically, I’m skeptical about claims of widespread soil depletion in the world as a cause of food supply degradation. To be sure you’re getting the nutrients you need, eat a wide variety of foods.

  • dolli

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • fulski naperste

    There's this thing called a free clinic. We already have these and they've been around for years. There's also this thing called medicaid; also been around for years. We already have universal health care. Why do we need more?

    I'm in the military, so I have government health care. I haven't been able to see a dentist in over two years.

    You think it will be the health care that Clinton and Obama get in the Senate, but it will be far, far different for the peasants.

  • rock belt

    light headed dizzyness is a sign of a fast irratic heart beat normaly called ATRAIL FIBULATION That can cause shortage of breath and lightheaded dizzyness its the heart demanding more oxygen than a healthy person i know i suffer from it

  • dyne zymann

    This is just examples I just thought off…trying to remember my BIO AP days, hope it helps.
    -You can either work hella hard by exercising right, and eating, but if it's compared with something like steroids, which is considered modern technology, it's a bust. Though steroids are illegal, it's still an extrinsic factor.
    -You can try to eat all the foods that you need for your body to get the daily vitamins and stuff, but due to technology, we have vitamin capsules now that's meant to do the same thing but far easier
    That's all I can think off. Hope this will at least get you started, if not thinking in a different way 🙂

  • hagberg

    If it's as consistent as you say most health professionals would classify you as pre-diabetic, you can lower those numbers by losing some weight and exercising more .

  • lovanagins

    I agree with you, but only that type 2 diabetes should have a different name. Even people who have absolutely no genetic family history of diabetes can get type 1 diabetes. ALL of the type 1 diabetics I have talked to either face to face or online had some kind of viral infection, often with a high fever for several days, before they were diagnosed. For those who want to give my response a thumbs down, you honestly don't know what you are talking about. Type 2 definitely can be genetic. Type 1 may not be, although if there is a genetic predisposition for type 2 diabetes because of racial heritage, like Native American Indian blood, you may be more susceptible to developing type 1 if you get a viral infection. I had roseola, a strep infection, when a 1 year and 8 months old. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 26 months old in May, 1955. A young adult who was diagnosed with type 1 in her 20's had had pneumonia. Two brother's had chicken pox before they were diagnosed. I suspect Mary Tyler Moore also had some type of viral infection before she was diagnosed in 1969. I also believe that type 1 diabetes is NOT a "conventional" auto-immune disease, as the paradigm for the last 25 years or so claims. Have your EVER heard of a type 1 diabetic going into remission where they need significantly less insulin for weeks or months, discounting the effects that male or female hormone cycles can have? I haven't, but there very well may be gaps in my knowledge that I am not aware of. I didn't know until September 1 this year that Type 1 diabetics can become insulin resistant. I've been a type 1 diabetic […]

  • vie

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • moff

    You could always check out things on-line, perhaps tutor/guide/coach on-line. There is a great Journalist site that pays for good write-ups if you enjoy writing. (unsure what curriculum you taught.)

    Sorry 2 hear of the Mrs' Health.

    Also goto the School U retired from (no pension) ask around, get some advice, even ask an older colleague whom may have retired prior 2 you what they had done. Options are avail. keep your head up and a smile on that face of yours. Remember " Smiling constantly relieves stress, plus it makes people wonder what your up to."

  • bazirby neshko

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • faab mar

    class=” ” From what you said I think “rid” is misleading. Well done on managing your diabetes, but be careful about making false claims.

  • uyen-ishek plow

    I tend to get up to check on her to make sure she's ok (not showing symptoms of low blood sugar) during the night – even when the doctor doesn't need me to call or fax in her blood sugars.]]>

  • ashi June 6, 2012 at 5:32 pm -

    Frankly, though, I don't think media stupidity is remotely isolated to diabetes. There are just so many more outlets for content to get published today and when you have more outlets for content, you also get a lot of BAD content.I see the media screw up diabetes the same way they screw up industries I've worked in, and for every good article, it often seems there are 3 bad ones which dull the affect of good writing.]]>

  • sanim

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • tryjaney

    You should limit your carbs to no more than 60g per meal or in one sitting. Spread it out throughout the day as much as possible. Sugar is a carb, so pay attention to carb intake. If you want to eat bread, it has to be whole wheat. Complex carbs take longer to absorb and are better for you. Foods made of refined sugar like cake, ice cream, soda, should mostly be avoided.
    The main thing is to limit your carbs. You want to save as many insulin secreting beta cells as possible which will make management easier for a long time.

    Your doctor should have referred you to an endocrinologist and a nutrionalist or diabetes class. If he/she did not, get a new doctor. The person is not doing a good job.

    Diabetes is a serious diagnosis and I'm so angry that so many doctors don't know better and are so lazy about treating it.

  • singson

    Im looking for someone to produce a 2000 word essay on Diabetes 1 & 2. This must in an academic form with Harvard referencing. Time frame is 2 weeks. Sources and more information will be given to the person who gets the position… (Budget: $30-$250 AUD, Jobs: Academic Writing)

  • hagg

    There is a power shift going on. Via blog and message board technology, consumers can voice their opinions in a new way — and a way that should be taken seriously by travel vendors.I was just blog surfing and found you! If you are interested in american association diabetes educator you should visit this related site american association diabetes educator You may find something of interest.]]>

  • ramaroutip

    "I just need to know how to prevent becoming fully Diabetic."

    Well to answer your question simply – maybe you can't.

    Three of the biggest risk factors for diabetes are genetics, ethnic origin and age.

    None of these are changeable.

  • totto

    Check out these blood sugar images: Diabetes Testing Strips Image by bodytel These blood glucose test strips are to use with the GlucoTel – Blood Glucose

  • gren bigliak

    diabetes365 where each of us is posting one photo a day that's about life with diabetes.

    The photos are great and we now have about nine photographers contributing. If anyone else would like to get involved we'd welcome them.]]>

  • bert both

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • bergeorger lisch

    The following are fructose related literature reviews, as well as comments from the Calorie Control Council in response to misinformation about fructose in the media. The articles below are listed alphabetically by author under the topic of the article.

  • jocht

    Neuropathy is almost inevitable when you are diabetic. It's damage to the nerve endings and usually affects the hands, arms, legs or feet the most. It can affect the face and the rest of the body in severe cases. It is burning, tingling sensations. In some more severe cases, it causes loss of feeling all together. The only thing you can do is what you have already been doing very well……control your disease. I have it in my feet. Sometimes my feet are cold and tingling, other times they feel hot and tingling. My doctor sent me to a neurologist and said that this condition can not be reversed. There are medications that can help a little if you have a lot of pain, but most have a lot of side effects. Some of the more common side effects are drowsiness and weight gain. Lyrica is one of the popular drugs, but it made me feel like a zombie. You must be careful about injuring your feet . Don't go in your bare feet while outside. You could get a foot injury and not be able to feel it.

  • mee

    Exercise Your Diabetes Away
    FYI Living
    Those who participated in exercise programs fared better than their more sluggish peers. Though any amount of exercise was helpful, workout sessions lasting longer than half an hour were best at decreasing anxiety symptoms. 2. …
    and more »

  • mant July 27, 2012 at 7:30 am -

    Frankly, though, I don't think media stupidity is remotely isolated to diabetes. There are just so many more outlets for content to get published today and when you have more outlets for content, you also get a lot of BAD content.I see the media screw up diabetes the same way they screw up industries I've worked in, and for every good article, it often seems there are 3 bad ones which dull the affect of good writing.]]>

  • fleechin parrimarke

    You're another diabetes blogger I found through Kerri's blog.I'm a mom whose son has diabetes.My husband came home from work saying that someone asked how Brendon was doing with his “sugar diabetes”. I was laughing.I'm so sorry to hear about your sister. I'm checking out the site right now.Your mom is right in that diabetes is so manageable. Keep blogging, keep educating yourself AND MOST IMPORTANTLY keep up with your endo visits every few months to keep track of your A1C's.I'll be checking in often.]]>

  • rotin

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • harppinovo

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • hugh

    "sweet foods" like candy pies and cakes are just the tip of the iceburg!

    How about how much breads, cereals, grains, root veggies, soft sweet fruits, dried beans, milk products do you eat in a day? How many grams? Some of that stuff is supposedly high fiber, but I am not convinced that it is at all what we should be eating.

    the high fiber foods I eat are broccoli, cauliflower, green beans, cabbage, brussel sprouts, spinach

  • scho

    “Endocrine Today” which has direct to-the-patient advice. I am putting it on the post as a reference and will put the URL right here: My own experience is that many physicians are not well informed about diabetes and you may try to find a medical group (not just one guy) who specialize in diabetes, and in your case, type 2 diabetes. Good Luck! carl-]]>

  • hoppenny brouvia

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • gos

    I haven't watched your video yet, I'll do that next. But I've never heard of a case of diabetes that's been cured. I've heard that it can be controlled to where it's like you don't have diabetes (type 2) … but you do still have it.

    –edit–

    I just watched the first 30 seconds, got disgusted and closed the window. I find it really upsetting when I see someone who seems to take it so seriously, yet gets it so wrong. I see you told him he's wrong in the comments section … good job on that! I may leave a comment for him too in a little bit. We'll convince him 😀

    –edit–

    Okayyy … but I'm making a new youtube account to do it with. I'm not using my regular account to disagree with a kid who calls himself "hacker" LOL

  • ling lienge

    If you watch TV daily for at least 2 to 3 hours your risk of developing diabetes type 2, having nonfatal cardiovascular disease and dying from any…

  • lee sayomi

    how about felting. i taught art next to a classroom where the children felted. and these children who for several reasons had a very short attention span got a kick out of felting balls. it was great seeing the seriousness in their faces when felting. and it is colour and it is wool.i really understand why it would be fun if she wanted to follow one of your passions. i come from a family of women making all kinds of needlework, only today my great niece was kissing the little tomte that her great great grandmother made, so for me it has been very natural to take up needlework (and i was not allowed to watch telly without doing something else at the same time). me sister, on the contrary, has never felt like doing anything of the kind. and about the diabetes. it is hard for a little one to have diabetes. sugar is all over the place. it must be so heartbreaking some times. it sounds like you are doing such a great job and enjoying yourself too. life is not fair, and neither were we promised it would be.]]>

  • getten keeg

    I will pop back in from time to time to see what you have new here.My site is a bit different than yours, but just as entertaining and educational, I run a diabetes food related site pertaining to diabetes food related articles.]]>

  • sondeberga

    For me it's coffee and cigarettes. I'm not suggesting you start smoking. Three cups of coffee daily is supposed to be healthy anyway (by what the latest news report has stated). Caffeine can also boost the metabolism.

  • mah

    “Endocrine Today” which has direct to-the-patient advice. I am putting it on the post as a reference and will put the URL right here: My own experience is that many physicians are not well informed about diabetes and you may try to find a medical group (not just one guy) who specialize in diabetes, and in your case, type 2 diabetes. Good Luck! carl-]]>

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